FP Plastics scam

We have just taken down another scam involving a fake UK company called FP Plastics.

If you have applied for one of their fake jobs and get a job offer, do not send them any money in order to (allegedly) buying plane tickets, visas or work permits. If you have send them money, contact your bank or credit card provider and your local police to report the fraud.

The phone number listed on their fake website belongs to the real FP Plastics, so ringing them will not help you as the real company are victims as well.

As we keep on repeating over and over, in order to be able to work in Europe the employer needs to submit an application for a work permit. A prospective employee can NOT do this.

Work permits are only given to licensed companies who can not find their staff anywhere in Europe, i.e. there is a huge shortage not just in the UK, but all over Europe. This is normally the case only for doctors, medical staff and other highly specialised staff.

Check out the UK government website (or the relevant government website if the company is based elsewhere in the EU) to see if your skills qualify for a work permit.

The following is applicable for the UK only, but the procedure is the same all over the EU.

Getting sponsored

You need to be employed by a licensed sponsor to apply to live in the UK. You can download the list of licensed sponsors to see if the company who has offered you a job is on the list.

Your sponsor checks that you can do the job they’re hiring you for and if it qualifies you for a visa. They’ll assign you a certificate of sponsorship to prove this.

They must also give you other information you need when you apply, for example how much you’ll be paid.

How long it will take

You can apply for a visa up to 3 months before the day you’re due to start work in the UK. This date is listed on your certificate of sponsorship.

You should get a decision on your visa within 3 weeks when you apply from outside the UK.

Check the guide processing times to find out how long getting a visa might take in your country.

So…..:

  1. Check the company online to see if they are real. You can use Companies House (UK only) to check if they really exist. A fake website can be created in no time.
  2. You can use LinkedIn.com to see if there are any employees listed for this company. Be very careful when you see anonymous LinkedIn accounts such as:
  3. Search Google for “Scam” and the company name. This will give you links to sites such as Scamwarners and others.
  4. Do a search for the domain name on Whois.com or websites of domain name providers. If the domains are registered recently, be very careful. The domain name should show a contact name. If this person uses a gmail address or another email address not linked to the company, again, be very suspicious.
  5. Never, ever pay a company to get a job. A company normally pays your (big) expenses and they will generally not ask you to pay them. Paying a company in the EU to get a job is generally regarded as bribing and is illegal.

 

Allen Jake Wood => Scam Beware!!!

We are receiving messages from people claiming that are being scammed by a guy called “Allen Jake Wood” using eurojobs@yahoo.com as an email address and claiming on Facebook he works as an agent with Eurojobs.

EUROJOBS.COM DOES NOT EMPLOY AGENTS!!! We only ever use our domain name in email addresses, so anything that is NOT ….@eurojobs.com has nothing to do with us.

Eurojobs.com does not act as an recruitment agent, headhunter or employment agent. We are only a job board and only exist on-line.

As we have said so many times before in this blog, NEVER EVER pay middlemen a fee in order to get a job. It doesn’t work like that in Europe. If a company is interested in hiring someone, you will be invited for an interview at the company’s offices and they will generally pay you for expenses incurred.

If you are from outside the European Union, the chances that you will get a job is almost zero. Unless you are a specialist who’s skills can not be found in the EU, companies are not allowed to hire someone from outside the EU. They have to find someone who has the (birth) right to work in the EU.

Below you will find a screengrab of this guy, but the likelyhood is that this a fake photo as well. Nigerian gangs are often behind this. Always check if you can find enough legitimate information elsewhere on the internet to corroborate his claims. In this case it probably is all fake.

IMG_2209

If you have been contacted by him and he is asking you for money to join his “program”, please report him to Facebook. You can do this by clicking on the … to the right of the Message icon in his profile picture.Screen Shot 2017-03-04 at 11.26.32

 

Inpetroleum.com – Another Oil Company scam

Inpetroleum.com is a ripp-off from https://www.cnrl.com, with the clear aim to lure unsupecting job seekers into paying for non-existing services.

They generally make you believe you have been invited for a job, a job interview or similar, BUT…… there is a small fee required in order to get the paper process rolling. They basically will ask you for some money. However, once you have paid you will never hear from them again and you will have lost your money.

Complain with the registrar about this scam if you have been duped into paying money and have lost it. Details of the scam registration are below:

Domain Name: INPETROLEUM.COM
Registry Domain ID: 2041255488_DOMAIN_COM-VRSN
Registrar WHOIS Server: whois.liquidnetlimited.co.uk
Registrar URL: http://liquidnetlimited.co.uk
Updated Date: 2016-07-31T10:40:57Z
Creation Date: 2016-07-09T10:52:38Z
Registrar Registration Expiration Date: 2017-07-09T10:52:38Z
Registrar: LIQUIDNET Ltd.
Registrar IANA ID: 1472
Registrar Abuse Contact Email: abuse@liquidnetlimited.co.uk
Registrar Abuse Contact Phone: +44.2036951294
Reseller:
Domain Status: clientTransferProhibited
Registry Registrant ID:
Registrant Name: Kwaku James
Registrant Organization: 
Registrant Street: P.O. BOX 0823-03411
Registrant City: PANAMA
Registrant State/Province: PANAMA
Registrant Postal Code: 00000
Registrant Country: GH
Registrant Phone: +507.8365503
Registrant Phone Ext: 
Registrant Fax: +51.17057182
Registrant Fax Ext: 
Registrant Email: haywoodharrison@hotmail.com
Registry Admin ID:
Admin Name: Kwaku James
Admin Organization: 
Admin Street: P.O. BOX 0823-03411
Admin City: PANAMA
Admin State/Province: PANAMA
Admin Postal Code: 00000
Admin Country: GH
Admin Phone: +507.8365503
Admin Phone Ext: 
Admin Fax: +51.17057182
Admin Fax Ext: 
Admin Email: info@petroleumexl.com
Registry Tech ID:
Tech Name: Kwaku James
Tech Organization: 
Tech Street: P.O. BOX 0823-03411
Tech City: PANAMA
Tech State/Province: PANAMA
Tech Postal Code: 00000
Tech Country: GH
Tech Phone: +507.8365503
Tech Phone Ext: 
Tech Fax: +51.17057182
Tech Fax Ext: 
Tech Email: info@petroleumexl.com
Name Server: dns1.ogdwebhost.com
Name Server: dns2.ogdwebhost.com
DNSSEC: not signed
URL of the ICANN WHOIS Data Problem Reporting System: http://wdprs.internic.net/
>>> Last update of WHOIS database: 2016-11-09T22:02:01Z <<<

MyEurojobs.com spam

It looks like there is a spammer again abusing one of our email addresses as a return address in spam messages. They’re offering fake jobs using grammatically challenged English.

The messages look like this: Continue reading

How to avoid a spam deluge

People complain a lot about the huge number of spam messages they receive. Sites are being accused of facilitating spammers, having poor security, etc. This might often be the case, but what the ‘receiver’ often forgets is that their online activity more often is the real cause of the deluge.

Spammers grab the email address to spam from somewhere and then try to ‘trick’ the system and the receiver into Continue reading

Fake hotel jobs

All these fake hotel jobs are becoming a bit of a nuisance. We keep booting them off the site, so you won’t even know they were there in the first place, but when you look around the net you’ll find many big name sites still hosting them totally unaware what a scam they are. (Haven’t they got filters, checks, etc in place?)

I just did a search for Prime Spring Hotel and sites still host these ‘vacancies’. This scam site has been taken down a while ago now, but the jobs are Continue reading

PSI Incorporation scam ( Cont…)

These scammers get more audacious by the day!

We highlighted the scam with PSI Incorporation (Papmac Securities and Investments) allegedly based in Wichita, Texas, USA a few days ago. Someone called Spiff White then rang (certainly not from a US phone number) to complain that we were harming their business. Yeah right. Stopping people from being scammed more like and hurting their scam income stream…..

He even demanded that we remove the blog post. No evidence given as to who they really are. And we just have to believe them…..

We then received the Continue reading

PSI Incorporation Scam

Just removed another scam. Again Nigerian!

PSI Incorporation claims to be a securities company, located at 4245, Kemp Blvd., Wichita Falls, Wichita Falls, TX 76308, USA.

A quick search on the net reveals that there is no mention anywhere of this company. A check on Whois.com reveals that the site was registered only a short while ago, somewhat strange for a company of that size. If the company had been trading Continue reading

Prime Spring Hotel scam

These hotel job scams keep on coming. This time the website of the Courthouse Hotel in Central London has been copied and abused for a job scam. The site has been renamed as the “PrimeSpring Hotel”. All pages, with the exception of the Careers section are the same. The purpose of these scams are to make people pay for fake visas, work permits and other ‘costs’. Once these fees have been paid, the ‘recruiter’ disappears.

So, don’t apply for these fake jobs, unless you want to lose money.

How can you protect yourself against these fake jobs?

1. Do a search on whois.com to find out who registered the site. If it’s not related to the website, stay well away. In this case this London based hotel website was registered by a Nigerian woman called Continue reading

Cyprus jobs challenge

Looking for a job in Cyprus is now becoming a costly affair. You now have to pay the prospective employer in order to be regarded a serious applicant. It doesn’t mean you can buy yourself a job though.

An advertised, low paid, entry-level job at the telecommunications authority CyTA received 3,000 more applicants than it did when it was last advertised two years ago. About 4,400 people applied for one of the about 100 vacancies in customer service and  sales. These jobs are paying €8 an hour with very few benefits according to CyTA. Not a particularly good job, but you have little choice when there are not too many jobs to get on the career ladder. Continue reading